Thread: A 'novel' Idea.
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Old 10-24-2011, 11:02 AM
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Sunshine73 Sunshine73 is offline
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I'm also an aspiring writer so I completely get where you're coming from. The first bit of advice I'd offer is to connect with the writing community. If you're on Twitter the #amwriting hashtag is a GREAT place to receive some general support as you journey through the writing process.

Now, if you know that your manuscript needs a lot of editing and redrafting - that's GOOD! Now is not the time you even want to think about trying to contact editors, agents or publishers. Now is the time to revise, rework and rewrite. When you've polished up pretty well, find some aspiring writers whose work you admire, whose opinion you trust and let them critique your work.

This can be a painful process as a good critique partner will let you know when your story doesn't work or your writing is painfully bad, etc. This doesn't mean you need to give up - this means you now have some input from a reader - fresh eyes sometimes make all the difference.

So, you take that advice and you rewrite and revise again (sometimes again and again and again) until your crit partner thinks it's good. Then you tap your writing friends for even more opinions. Get a few people to beta read your work.

Beta readers are, again, experienced writers (and readers) whom you trust to read your work and give you feed back. By this time the manuscript is usually polished well enough that there shouldn't be any glaring issues but there may be story line issues, general plot holes, etc. that may be annoying to a reader. Your Betas should help you catch those things and you can rewrite and revise again.

Once you've gotten it as polished and flaw free as you can, that's when you start drafting query letters to agents to see about getting repped so you can get your book published! It's a long, hard process - but if you love to write, it's a labor of love.
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