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  #1  
Old 11-26-2005, 03:59 PM
SnowAngelChristmas SnowAngelChristmas is offline
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Questions

This is the Place to ask any questions that you may have or answer the questions of others.

This may sound relly weird But here's mine -

Who invented the meatball? Did someone just say "Ah, yes. Meat is good but, would be better in ball form!"
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Old 12-06-2005, 02:37 PM
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yes
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Old 12-06-2005, 04:22 PM
Smemorina Smemorina is offline
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Who has invented the meatball does not know it, but to it appeals to to me in many ways of meat - grass (I do not know is written well), laughed excluded those poisoned...

ciaoooo
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Old 12-26-2005, 04:06 PM
SnowAngelChristmas SnowAngelChristmas is offline
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Originally Posted by Smemorina


Who has invented the meatball does not know it, but to it appeals to to me in many ways of meat - grass (I do not know is written well), laughed excluded those poisoned...

ciaoooo
possible. quite possible.
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  #5  
Old 12-28-2005, 05:00 PM
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AuntieMistletoeDear AuntieMistletoeDear is offline
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AuntieMistletoeDear you could wrap up and put under the treeAuntieMistletoeDear you could wrap up and put under the treeAuntieMistletoeDear you could wrap up and put under the treeAuntieMistletoeDear you could wrap up and put under the treeAuntieMistletoeDear you could wrap up and put under the treeAuntieMistletoeDear you could wrap up and put under the treeAuntieMistletoeDear you could wrap up and put under the treeAuntieMistletoeDear you could wrap up and put under the treeAuntieMistletoeDear you could wrap up and put under the treeAuntieMistletoeDear you could wrap up and put under the treeAuntieMistletoeDear you could wrap up and put under the tree
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The use of "meatball" for "any combination of raw or cooked meat shaped into balls" dates back at least to 1838 (the Oxford English Dictionary's oldest citation). An 1877 recipe used mutton and veal necks, but variously seasoned meatballs had been known by other names in other cultures. There were spicy Greek keftedes containing minced veal, onions, herbs, and breadcrumbs; olde English pome-dorries (dating back to at least A.D. 1381) made of beef and egg yolks or pork liver and flour; and the much loved Italian and Swedish meatballs.

Origin of the Meatball - here is one theory to answer your question . . .

Meatballs have been around for a very long time. The word meatball has been in the dictionary since 1838, but meatballs have been around ever since a thrifty prehistoric cook cleaned up the tiny bits of raw meat that were left after a prehistoric butcher was done hacking up whatever game the hunters brought home. That clever cook took those tiny bits of leftover meat and mixed them up with leftover cooked grains and herb leaves and then roasted them on the edge of the fire and served them to the chewing-impaired children and old folks. They looked and smelled and tasted so good that before long, even those with full sets of sharp teeth wanted a share of this new invention. Butchers started "accidentally" leaving behind more tiny bits of meat and cooks got more inventive with their recipes and eventually the popularity of the meatball led to the invention of meat grinders and bread crumbs and ice cream scoops and all sorts of other handy things that never would have been invented without the existence of the meatball!

Here’s another theory . . . Well this one speaks of the origin of spaghetti and meatballs.

“Polpette” (meatballs) are Italian. So is spaghetti.
But the combination isn’t. “Meatballs and spaghetti,” like chop suey, was invented in the United States in the early part of the 20th Century.
In Italy, diners customarily eat a pasta course first, then a meat course. So, if an Italian eats meatballs and spaghetti, it will be in separate courses.
What is billed here as “Italian meatballs” can take the form simply of hamburger (ground beef) fashioned into the shape and size of golf balls. But meatballs, as prepared in Italy, contain other ingredients, including grated cheese—and, like meatballs from other lands, often contain veal and/or pork in addition to, or instead of, beef.
And meatballs in Italy are often made from cooked meats.
In 1944, an English version of an Italian cookbook by Pellegrino Artusi appeared in print titled, simply, “Italian Cook Book.” It recommended “meat balls made with boiled meat,” but noted that “if raw meat is preferred, less ingredients for seasoning should be used.”
Here’s the recipe for Italian meatballs:
“Chop the boiled meat in a mortar. Chop a sliced ham separately. Add the ham to the meat and season everything with Parmesan, salt, pepper, and some flavor of spice. Add some raisins, pine seeds and two spoonfuls of bread, boiled either in soup or milk. Bind this compound with an egg or two, according to the quantity. Make meat balls as large as one egg, flatten them at both ends, cover them with grated bread and fry them in oil or lard. Make a fricassee with a little garlic and parsley, place it in a flat pan together with the fat left in the pan where the meat balls were fried, and add the meat balls. Sprinkle on egg-lemon sauce and let it take on flavor. If the garlic-parsley fricassee is objectionable, place the meat balls in the flat pan with a piece of butter only.”

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  #6  
Old 12-28-2005, 05:04 PM
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AuntieMistletoeDear you could wrap up and put under the treeAuntieMistletoeDear you could wrap up and put under the treeAuntieMistletoeDear you could wrap up and put under the treeAuntieMistletoeDear you could wrap up and put under the treeAuntieMistletoeDear you could wrap up and put under the treeAuntieMistletoeDear you could wrap up and put under the treeAuntieMistletoeDear you could wrap up and put under the treeAuntieMistletoeDear you could wrap up and put under the treeAuntieMistletoeDear you could wrap up and put under the treeAuntieMistletoeDear you could wrap up and put under the treeAuntieMistletoeDear you could wrap up and put under the tree
Reply For Smemorina:

Qui sono due teorie sull'origine della polpetta (e degli spaghetti e delle polpette). Dal vostro amico, Auntie Mistletoe

L'uso "polpetta" per "tutta la combinazione di carne grezza o cotta ha modellato delle date nelle sfere" indietro molto più lontano, almeno a 1838 (la più vecchia citazione del dizionario inglese de Oxford). I colli del vitello e 1877 del montone usato ricetta, ma polpette variamente condite erano stati conosciuti da altri nomi in altre colture. Ci erano keftedes greci piccanti che contengono il vitello, le cipolle, le erbe ed il pangrattato tritati; pomo-dorries inglese del olde (che data almeno da A.d. 1381) fatto dei tuorli d'uovo e del manzo o del fegato e della farina del porco; ed il molto amava le polpette italiane e svedesi. Origine della polpetta - qui è una teoria per rispondere alla vostra domanda. . . Le polpette sono state intorno per un tempo molto molto. La polpetta di parola è stata nel dizionario dal 1838, ma le polpette sono state intorno da quando un cuoco prehistoric thrifty ha pulito le punte molto piccole di carne grezza che sono state lasciate dopo che un macellaio prehistoric fosse l'incisione fatta su che cosa gioco i cacciatori hanno portato a sede. Che il cuoco intelligente ha preso quelle punte molto piccole di carne rimanente e mescolate loro in su con i grani e l'erba cucinati rimanenti li lasciano ed allora arrostiscono sul bordo del fuoco e servito loro ai bambini mastic-alterati ed alla gente anziana. Hanno osservato e sentito l'odore di ed avuto un sapore così buoni che fra poco, persino quelli con gli insiemi completi dei denti taglienti hanno desiderato una parte di questa nuova invenzione. "casualmente" lasciare iniziato macellai le punte più molto piccole di carne e dei cuochi ottenuti più inventivi con le loro ricette e finalmente la popolarità della polpetta ha condotto all'invenzione delle smerigliatrici della carne e delle palette delle briciole del pane e del gelato e di tutte le specie di altre cose pratiche che non sarebbero state inventate mai senza l'esistenza della polpetta!


"Polpette" (polpette) è italiano. Così sono gli spaghetti. Ma la combinazione non è. "le polpette e gli spaghetti," come il suey di taglio, sono stati inventati negli Stati Uniti nella parte precedente del ventesimo secolo. In Italia, i diners mangiano abitualmente un corso della pasta in primo luogo, allora un corso della carne. Così, se un italiano mangia le polpette e gli spaghetti, sarà nei corsi separati. Che cosa è fatturato qui come "le polpette italiane" possono prendere semplicemente la forma dell'hamburger (carne trittata) adattato nella figura e nel formato delle sfere di golf. Ma le polpette, come preparate in Italia, contengono altri ingredienti, compreso formaggio grattato -- e, come le polpette da altre terre, contenga spesso il vitello e/o il porco oltre che, o anziché, manzo. E le polpette in Italia sono fatte spesso dalle carni cotte. In 1944, una versione inglese di un cookbook italiano da Pellegrino Artusi è sembrato in stampa nominata, semplicemente, "libro italiano del cuoco." Ha suggerito "le sfere della carne fatte con carne bollita," ma celebre quello "se la carne grezza è preferita, meno ingredienti per condimento dovrebbero essere usati." Qui è la ricetta per le polpette italiane: "tagli la carne a pezzi bollita in un mortaio. Tagli esclusivamente un prosciutto a pezzi affettare. Aggiunga il prosciutto alla carne e condisca tutto con parmigiano, sale, pepe e un certo sapore della spezia. Aggiunga qualche uva passa, semi di pino e due spoonfuls di pane, hanno bollito in minestra o latte. Leghi questo residuo con un uovo o due, secondo la quantità. Renda le sfere della carne grandi come un uovo, le appiattisce ad entrambe le estremità, le riguarda di pane grattato e le frigge in petrolio o lardo. Faccia un fricassee con un pochi aglio e prezzemolo, dispongalo in una vaschetta piana insieme al grasso di sinistra nella vaschetta in cui le sfere della carne sono state fritte ed aggiunga le sfere della carne. Spruzzi sulla salsa del uovo-limone e lascila intraprendere sapore. Se il fricassee del aglio-prezzemolo è discutibile, disponga le sfere della carne nella vaschetta piana con una parte di burro soltanto."

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  #7  
Old 12-29-2005, 08:50 AM
SnowAngelChristmas SnowAngelChristmas is offline
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Thanks! I just had to get an answer because one day (last friday) i was making swedish meatballs for Chistmas dinner and i realized i didn't know where they came from. obviously Swedish meatballs came sweden but i didn't know who "invented" them. thanks again.
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Old 01-14-2006, 05:18 AM
skiparooney skiparooney is offline
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Old 01-17-2006, 07:33 PM
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I figured it was invented by some single guy who only had one clean utensil left, his ice cream scoop. Before I was married (I was single for 37 years!) I used to use my ice cream scoop to eat cereal. I would comb my hair by placing two forks side by side as a comb. I'm sorry, isn't this the Pitiful Stories forum?
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Old 02-20-2006, 12:03 AM
Smemorina Smemorina is offline
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Hello
I excuse myself if I have not more written but I am pledged with a work..
Thanks very interesting AuntieMistletoeDear what you said! !!!
I wanted to say that the mincemeat, in Italy eat themselves also with the spaghetti, use themselves so in the south Italy, while from those to the north eat separated themselves! The mincemeat are often made with the meat is true, but not only!!
The mincemeat I can be done also with the laughter, or with the vegetables.. From not to confuse itself with the crochet (do not I know how it it is written!!) that I am alone of potatoes and cheese! MMmmm
Ciao ciaoooooo
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